Home > Chiropractic > Healthy Muscles

Healthy Muscles

 

Muscles exist to move, or they fade away. Muscles work in patterns with joints to move the body internally producing external movements everyone can see. Joints enable muscles to operate around corners, anatomically speaking. Joints exist to help muscle push or pull force in any anatomical plane. Healthy muscles and joints facilitate an amazing potential of movement within the body. Deconditioning reduces this potential.

Disease, degeneration, and disuse can all lead to muscular weakening. Injury is a more obvious way to weaken muscles and destabilise joints. AKA: muscular imbalances. Yet time itself seems also capable of creating un-coordinated and compensatory movements. Muscular imbalance stubs joints, leading to inflammatory reactions within joints.

See  Muscular Imbalance Leads to Osteoarthritis – Fascia First Chiropractic

The strength of muscles is reliant upon their coordinated firing something that can be improved by a manual therapy intervention (1). Interventions that help muscles in this way can also help the spine and the brain (2). Furthermore, it is in the repeated application of manual interventions that carry the potential for neuroplasticity in the cortex and cerebellum of the brain following motor sequence learning (3).

This might be why Chiropractic once a month works well (4) to keep muscles and joints healthy.

Apart from visit your Chiropractor enjoy exercises and maintain a variety of movement and your muscles and joints will be as healthy as they can be..

 

 

Book Today.

 

 

References:

  1. Zero AM and Rice CL (2021) Spinal and supraspinal responses to muscle potentiation in humans. Eur J Appl Physiol 121 (5) 1271
  2. Niazi IK et al (2015) Changes in H-Reflex and V-Waves following spinal manipulation. EXP Brain Res 233(4) 1165
  3. Tavor I et al (2020) Short Term Plasticity following motor sequence learning revealed by diffusion MR Imaging. Human Brain Mapp 41 442
  4. Eklund A et al (2018) The Nordic Maintenance Care Programme PLOS One 13(9) e0203029
%d bloggers like this: